FAME

  1. Home
  2. keyboard_arrow_right
  3. Secondary Projects
  4. keyboard_arrow_right
  5. FAME
The Fractured Ankle Management Evaluation (FAME) Trial

Aim

This study aims to determine whether ankle function, four months after treatment in patients with
unstable ankle fractures treated with close contact casting, is not worse than in those treated with surgical
intervention, which is the current standard-of-care.

Background/method

Ankle fracture is one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries sustained in the UK. Many
patients experience pain and physical impairment, with the consequences of the fracture and its
management lasting for several months or even years. The broad aim of ankle fracture treatment is to
maintain the alignment of the joint whilst the fracture heals and to reduce the risks of problems such as
stiffness. More severe injuries to the ankle are routinely treated surgically. However, even with advances
in surgery, there remains a risk of complications; for patients experiencing these, the associated loss of
function and quality-of-life is considerable. Non-surgical treatment is an alternative to surgery and involves
applying a cast carefully shaped to the patient’s ankle to correct and maintain alignment of the joint; the
key benefit being a reduction in the frequency of common complications of surgery. The main potential
risk of non-surgical treatment is a loss of alignment with a consequent reduction in ankle function.

Chief investigator

Chief investigator

Professor Xavier Griffin

Principal investigator

Principal investigator

Ansar Mahmood
0
Current recruitment number
Menu