The development of novel antibacterial technologies: high-throughput light delivery and characterisation for optimisation of photodisinfection

  1. Home
  2. keyboard_arrow_right
  3. Reconstruction
  4. keyboard_arrow_right
  5. The development of novel antibacterial technologies: high-throughput light delivery and characterisation for optimisation of photodisinfection
Milestone n:0%
0%
What does each milestone mean?

    1 = Clinical need
    2 = Idea
    3 = Proof of concept
    4 = Proof of feasibility
    5 = Proof of value
    6 = Initial clinical trials
    7 = Validation of solution
    8 = Approval and launch
    9 = Clinical use
    10 = Standard of care

Aim

To build upon prior research into the antimicrobial effects of high-intensity blue light and see if a reduction of the duration required for killing bacteria is possible.

Lay Summary

Due to its intrinsic antibacterial properties, using blue light to kill bacteria is increasingly attractive. Blue light causes the bacterial cell to release oxidative species which are toxic to the cell. Previous studies have shown that blue light was able to kill numerous, antibiotic-resistant bugs in single or biofilm (when bacteria group together) forms. We want to build upon this knowledge to see if using other doses of light might be even more effective at killing bacteria.

Background

The team have shown in the laboratory that high-intensity blue light (part of the visible light spectrum) is antimicrobial against bacteria and biofilms, and a promising agent for the treatment of contaminated or infected wounds. We wish to do further experiments to see if we can reduce the duration required for bacterial killing, and to investigate whether other wavelengths or doses of light offer improved activity.

Method

In collaboration with the University of Birmingham, the dental school, and Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, the team is planning to perform a range of laboratory tests on key wound bacteria in order to ascertain an optimal wavelength (or combination) of visible light, dose and duration, that can be used as a novel antibacterial technology for the decontamination of wounds. They will also perform host cell toxicity studies in the laboratory to ensure there are no adverse effects on human tissue cells following light delivery.

Research Team

Dr Beryl Oppenheim
Dr Fenella Halstead
Dr Mohammed Hadis

Related Projects

Menu